Interdisciplinary Studies
· African American Studies
· American Studies
· Asian Studies
· Classics
· Cultural Studies
· Eighteenth-Century Studies
· Latino/a and Latin American Studies
· Medieval and Renaissance Studies
· Middle East Studies
· Native American Studies
· Slavic and Eurasian Studies


Journals and Collections
· American Institutions and Society
· Indonesia Journal

   
1 2 3 4 5 6 >>>
    sort list by publication date


Allegories of America
Narratives, Metaphysics, Politics
Frederick M. Dolan
Allegories of America offers a bold idea of what, in terms of political theory, it means to be American. Beginning with the question What do we want from a theory of politics? Dolan explores the metaphysics of American-ness and stops along the way to reflect on John Winthrop, the Constitution, 1950s behavioralist social science, James Merrill...



I Am Not a Tractor!
How Florida Farmworkers Took On the Fast Food Giants and Won
Susan L. Marquis
I Am Not a Tractor! celebrates the courage, vision, and creativity of the farmworkers and community leaders who have transformed one of the worst agricultural situations in the United States into one of the best. Susan L. Marquis highlights past abuses workers suffered in Florida’s tomato fields: toxic pesticide exposure, beatings, sexual...



Anthropogenic Rivers
The Production of Uncertainty in Lao Hydropower
Jerome Whitington
In the 2000s, Laos was treated as a model country for the efficacy of privatized, "sustainable" hydropower projects as viable options for World Bank-led development. By viewing hydropower as a process that creates ecologically uncertain environments, Jerome Whitington reveals how new forms of managerial care have emerged in the context of a...



Art and Engagement in Early Postwar Japan
Justin Jesty
Justin Jesty’s Art and Engagement in Early Postwar Japan reframes the history of art and its politics in Japan post-1945. This fascinating cultural history addresses our broad understanding of the immediate postwar era moving toward the Cold War and subsequent consolidations of political and cultural life. At the same time, Jesty delves into an...



The Avars
A Steppe Empire in Central Europe, 567–822
Walter Pohl
The Avars arrived in Europe from the Central Asian steppes in the mid-sixth century CE and dominated much of Central and Eastern Europe for almost 250 years. Fierce warriors and canny power brokers, the Avars were more influential and durable than Attila's Huns, yet have remained hidden in history. Walter Pohl's epic narrative, translated into...



Bang Chan
Social History of a Rural Community in Thailand
Lauriston Sharp, Lucien M. Hanks
Bang Chan traces the changing cultural characteristics of a small Siamese village during the century and a quarter from its founding as a wilderness settlement outside Bangkok to its absorption into the urban spread of the Thai capital. Rich in ethnographic detail, the book sums up the major findings of a pioneering interdisciplinary research...



Banished to the Great Northern Wilderness
Political Exile and Re-education in Mao’s China
Ning Wang
After Mao Zedong’s Anti-Rightist Campaign of 1957–58, Chinese intellectuals were subjected to "re-education" by the state. In Banished to the Great Northern Wilderness, Ning Wang draws on labor farm archives, interviews, and memoirs to provide a remarkable look at the suffering and complex psychological world of these banished Beijing...



Battling the Buddha of Love
A Cultural Biography of the Greatest Statue Never Built
Jessica Marie Falcone
Battling the Buddha of Love is a work of advocacy anthropology that explores the controversial plans and practices of the Maitreya Project, a transnational Buddhist organization, as it sought to build the "world's tallest statue" as a multi-million-dollar "gift" to India. Hoping to forcibly acquire 750 acres of occupied land for the statue park...



Blackness Visible
Essays on Philosophy and Race
Charles W. Mills
Charles Mills makes visible in the world of mainstream philosophy some of the crucial issues of the black experience.



Borderline Citizens
The United States, Puerto Rico, and the Politics of Colonial Migration
Robert C. McGreevey
Borderline Citizens explores the intersection of U.S. colonial power and Puerto Rican migration. Robert C. McGreevey examines a series of confrontations in the early decades of the twentieth century between colonial migrants seeking work and citizenship in the metropole and various groups—employers, colonial officials, court officers, and labor...



1 2 3 4 5 6 >>>

Connect with us

Newsletters