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Our Frontier Is the World
The Boy Scouts in the Age of American Ascendancy
Mischa Honeck
Mischa Honeck’s Our Frontier Is the World is a provocative account of how the Boy Scouts echoed and enabled American global expansion in the twentieth century.The Boy Scouts of America (BSA) has long been a standard bearer for national identity. The core values of the organization have, since its founding in 1910, shaped what it means to be an...



Harvests, Feasts, and Graves
Postcultural Consciousness in Contemporary Papua New Guinea
Ryan Schram
Ryan Schram explores the experiences of living in intercultural and historical conjunctures among Auhelawa people of Papua New Guinea in Harvests, Feasts, and Graves. In this ethnographic investigation, Schram ponders how Auhelawa question the meaning of social forms and through this questioning seek paths to establish a new sense of their...



Why Terrorists Quit
The Disengagement of Indonesian Jihadists
Julie Chernov Hwang
Why do hard-line terrorists decide to leave their organizations and quit the world of terror and destruction? This is the question for which Julie Chernov Hwang seeks answers in Why Terrorists Quit.Over the course of six years Chernov Hwang conducted more than one hundred interviews with current and former leaders and followers of radical...



Resurrecting Nagasaki
Reconstruction and the Formation of Atomic Narratives
Chad Diehl
In Resurrecting Nagasaki, Chad R. Diehl examines the reconstruction of Nagasaki City after the atomic bombing of August 9, 1945. Diehl illuminates the genesis of narratives surrounding the bombing by following the people and groups who contributed to the city's rise from the ashes and shaped its postwar image in Japan and the world. Municipal...



The One-Way Street of Integration
Fair Housing and the Pursuit of Racial Justice in American Cities
Edward G. Goetz
The One-Way Street of Integration examines two contrasting housing policy approaches to achieving racial justice. Integration initiatives and community development efforts have been for decades contrasting means of achieving racial equity through housing policy. Edward G. Goetz doesn’t see the solution to racial injustice as the government...



Limits to Decolonization
Indigeneity, Territory, and Hydrocarbon Politics in the Bolivian Chaco
Penelope Anthias
Penelope Anthias’s Limits to Decolonization addresses one of the most important issues in contemporary indigenous politics: struggles for territory. Based on the experience of thirty-six Guaraní communities in the Bolivian Chaco, Anthias reveals how two decades of indigenous mapping and land titling have failed to reverse a historical...



From Miracle to Mirage
The Making and Unmaking of the Korean Middle Class, 1960-2015
Myungji Yang
Myungji Yang’s From Miracle to Mirage is a critical account of the trajectory of state-sponsored middle-class formation in Korea in the second half of the twentieth century. Yang’s book offers a compelling story of the reality behind the myth of middle-class formation. Capturing the emergence, reproduction, and fragmentation of the Korean...



Svay
A Khmer Village in Cambodia
May Mayko Ebihara
May Mayko Ebihara (1934–2005) was the first American anthropologist to conduct ethnographic research in Cambodia. Svay provides a remarkably detailed picture of individual villagers and of Khmer social structure and kinship, agriculture, politics, and religion. The world Ebihara described would soon be shattered by Pol Pot's Khmer Rouge. Fifty...



Promiscuous Media
Film and Visual Culture in Imperial Japan, 1926-1945
Hikari Hori
In Promiscuous Media, Hikari Hori makes a compelling case that the visual culture of Showa-era Japan articulated urgent issues of modernity rather than serving as a simple expression of nationalism. Hori makes clear that the Japanese cinema of the time was in fact almost wholly built on a foundation of Russian and British film theory as well as...



They Will Have Their Game
Sporting Culture and the Making of the Early American Republic
Kenneth Cohen
In They Will Have Their Game, Kenneth Cohen explores how sports, drinking, gambling, and theater produced a sense of democracy while also reinforcing racial, gender, and class divisions in early America. Pairing previously unexplored financial records with a wide range of published reports, unpublished correspondence, and material and visual...



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