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· A New History of the Peloponnesian War

   
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To Build as Well as Destroy
American Nation Building in South Vietnam
Andrew J. Gawthorpe
For years, the "better war" school of thought has argued that the United States built a legitimate and viable non-Communist state in South Vietnam in the latter years of the Vietnam War, and that it was only the military "abandonment" of this state that brought down the Republic of Vietnam. But Andrew J. Gawthorpe, through a detailed and...



Nation-Empire
Ideology and Rural Youth Mobilization in Japan and Its Colonies
Sayaka Chatani
By the end of World War II, hundreds of thousands of young men in the Japanese colonies, in particular Taiwan and Korea, had expressed their loyalty to the empire by volunteering to join the army. Why and how did so many colonial youth become passionate supporters of Japanese imperial nationalism? And what happened to these youth after the war...



The City Lament
Jerusalem across the Medieval Mediterranean
Tamar M. Boyadjian
Poetic elegies for lost or fallen cities are seemingly as old as cities themselves. In the Judeo-Christian tradition, this genre finds its purest expression in the Book of Lamentations, which mourns the destruction of Jerusalem; in Arabic, this genre is known as the rithā’ al-mudun. The City Lament, Tamar M. Boyadjian traces the trajectory of...



War Tourism
Second World War France from Defeat and Occupation to the Creation of Heritage
Bertram M. Gordon
As German troops entered Paris following their victory in June 1940, the American journalist William L. Shirer observed that they carried cameras and behaved as "naïve tourists." One of the first things Hitler did after his victory was to tour occupied Paris, where he was famously photographed in front of the Eiffel Tower.Focusing on tourism by...



Atomic Assurance
The Alliance Politics of Nuclear Proliferation
Alexander Lanoszka
Do alliances curb efforts by states to develop nuclear weapons? Atomic Assurance looks at what makes alliances sufficiently credible to prevent nuclear proliferation; how alliances can break down and so encourage nuclear proliferation; and whether security guarantors like the United States can use alliance ties to end the nuclear efforts of...



The Commander's Dilemma
Violence and Restraint in Wartime
Amelia Hoover Green
Why do some military and rebel groups commit many types of violence, creating an impression of senseless chaos, whereas others carefully control violence against civilians? A classic catch-22 faces the leaders of armed groups and provides the title for Amelia Hoover Green’s book. Leaders need large groups of people willing to kill and maim—but...



14/18—Rupture or Continuity
Belgian Art around World War I
World War I had a major effect on Belgian visual arts. German occupation, the horror at the battlefield and the experience of exile, led to multiple narratives and artistic expressions by Belgian artists during and after the war. Belgian interbellum art is extremely vibrant and diverse. 14/18 – Rupture or Continuity takes a look at Belgian...



Resurrecting Nagasaki
Reconstruction and the Formation of Atomic Narratives
Chad R. Diehl
In Resurrecting Nagasaki, Chad R. Diehl examines the reconstruction of Nagasaki City after the atomic bombing of August 9, 1945. Diehl illuminates the genesis of narratives surrounding the bombing by following the people and groups who contributed to the city's rise from the ashes and shaped its postwar image in Japan and the world. Municipal...



Brutality in an Age of Human Rights
Activism and Counterinsurgency at the End of the British Empire
Brian Drohan
In Brutality in an Age of Human Rights, Brian Drohan demonstrates that British officials’ choices concerning counterinsurgency methods have long been deeply influenced or even redirected by the work of human rights activists. To reveal how that influence was manifested by military policies and practices, Drohan examines three British...



The Military Enlightenment
War and Culture in the French Empire from Louis XIV to Napoleon
Christy Pichichero, Christy L. Pichichero
The Military Enlightenment brings to light a radically new narrative both on the Enlightenment and the French armed forces from Louis XIV to Napoleon. Christy Pichichero makes a striking discovery: the Geneva Conventions, post-traumatic stress disorder, the military "band of brothers," and soldierly heroism all found their antecedents in the...



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