Interdisciplinary Studies > American Studies

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Unbuttoning America
A Biography of "Peyton Place"
Ardis Cameron
In this lively account of the writing, publication, and legacy of the 1956 bestselling novel, “Peyton Place,” Ardis Cameron tells how the story of a patricide in a small New England village became a cultural phenomenon.


"Unbuttoning America is a wonderful book about a fascinating and historically significant topic: Grace Metalious, her novel Peyton Place, and her readers. It is clearly argued, strongly researched, impressively structured, and beautifully written. The consistent use of readers' fan letters, combined with quotes from Metalious and her personal and professional contemporaries, provides a thorough analysis and vivid sense of the production and reception of this literary... cont'd



For God and Globe
Christian Internationalism in the United States between the Great War and the Cold War
Michael G. Thompson
For God and Globe recovers the history of an important yet largely forgotten intellectual movement in interwar America. Michael G. Thompson explores the way radical-left and ecumenical Protestant internationalists articulated new understandings of the ethics of international relations between the 1920s and the 1940s.



Hear My Sad Story
The True Tales That Inspired "Stagolee," "John Henry," and Other Traditional American Folk Songs
Richard Polenberg
In Hear My Sad Story, Richard Polenberg describes the historical events that led to the writing of many famous American folk songs that served as touchstones for generations of American musicians, lyricists, and folklorists.



Saving Faith
Making Religious Pluralism an American Value at the Dawn of the Secular Age
David Mislin
In Saving Faith, David Mislin chronicles the transformative historical moment when Americans began to reimagine their nation as one strengthened by the diverse faiths of its peoples. Between 1875 and 1925, liberal Protestant leaders abandoned religious exclusivism and leveraged their considerable cultural influence to push others to do the same.



The Public Universal Friend
Jemima Wilkinson and Religious Enthusiasm in Revolutionary America
Paul B. Moyer
In The Public Universal Friend, Paul B. Moyer tells the story of Jemima Wilkinson and her remarkable church, the Society of Universal Friends.The life of the Public Universal Friend and the Friend's church offer important insights about changes to religious life, gender, and society in Revolutionary America.



Under the Strain of Color
Harlem's Lafargue Clinic and the Promise of an Antiracist Psychiatry
Gabriel N. Mendes
In Under the Strain of Color, Gabriel N. Mendes recaptures the history of a largely forgotten New York City institution that embodied new ways of thinking about mental health, race, and the substance of citizenship. Harlem's Lafargue Mental Hygiene Clinic was founded in 1946.



Recapturing the Oval Office
New Historical Approaches to the American Presidency
In Recapturing the Oval Office, leading historians and social scientists forge an agenda for returning the study of the presidency to the mainstream practice of history and they chart how the study of the presidency can be integrated into historical narratives that combine rich analyses of political, social, and cultural history.



Suffrage Reconstructed
Gender, Race, and Voting Rights in the Civil War Era
Laura E. Free
Suffrage Reconstructed offers a new interpretation of the Civil War–era remaking of American democracy, placing African American activists and women's rights advocates at the heart of nineteenth-century American conversations about public policy, civil rights, and the franchise.



Christian Imperialism
Converting the World in the Early American Republic
Emily Conroy-Krutz
In describing how American missionaries interacted with a range of foreign locations (including India, Liberia, the Middle East, the Pacific Islands, North America, and Singapore) and imperial contexts, Christian Imperialism provides a new perspective on how Americans thought of their country's role in the world.



A Not Too Greatly Changed Eden
The Story of the Philosophers' Camp in the Adirondacks
James Schlett
In A Not too Greatly Changed Eden, James Schlett recounts the story of the 1858 Philosophers' Camp at Follensby Pond in the Adirondacks, from the lives and careers of—and friendships and frictions among—the participants to the extensive preparations for the expedition and the several-day encampment to its lasting legacy.



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