Interdisciplinary Studies > American Studies

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Unbuttoning America
A Biography of "Peyton Place"
Ardis Cameron
In this lively account of the writing, publication, and legacy of the 1956 bestselling novel, “Peyton Place,” Ardis Cameron tells how the story of a patricide in a small New England village became a cultural phenomenon.


"Unbuttoning America is a wonderful book about a fascinating and historically significant topic: Grace Metalious, her novel Peyton Place, and her readers. It is clearly argued, strongly researched, impressively structured, and beautifully written. The consistent use of readers' fan letters, combined with quotes from Metalious and her personal and professional contemporaries, provides a thorough analysis and vivid sense of the production and reception of this literary... cont'd



A Not Too Greatly Changed Eden
The Story of the Philosophers' Camp in the Adirondacks
James Schlett
In A Not too Greatly Changed Eden, James Schlett recounts the story of the 1858 Philosophers' Camp at Follensby Pond in the Adirondacks, from the lives and careers of—and friendships and frictions among—the participants to the extensive preparations for the expedition and the several-day encampment to its lasting legacy.



Fat-Talk Nation
The Human Costs of America’s War on Fat
Susan Greenhalgh
Susan Greenhalgh tells the story of the "war on fat" and its psychological impact on young people, giving them an opportunity to speak about experiences that have long lain hidden in silence and shame.



Class Divide
Yale ’64 and the Conflicted Legacy of the Sixties
Howard Jr. Gillette
Howard Gillette Jr. draws on more than one hundred interviews with representative members of the Yale class of ’64 to examine how they were challenged by the issues that would define the 1960s.



Forgotten Men and Fallen Women
The Cultural Politics of New Deal Narratives
Holly Allen
Holly Allen explores popular and official narratives of forgotten manhood, fallen womanhood, and other social and moral archetypes during the Great Depression and the Second World War.



"No One Helped"
Kitty Genovese, New York City, and the Myth of Urban Apathy
Marcia M. Gallo
Marcia M. Gallo provides a sensitive and multifaceted exploration of one of America's most infamous true-crime stories: the 1964 rape and murder of Catherine "Kitty" Genovese.



The Familiar Made Strange
American Icons and Artifacts after the Transnational Turn
In this volume, twelve distinguished historians offer original readings of American icons and artifacts that model new interpretive, transnational approaches to studying American history.



Where the River Burned
Carl Stokes and the Struggle to Save Cleveland
David Stradling, Richard Stradling
In Where the River Burned, David Stradling and Richard Stradling describe Cleveland's nascent transition from polluted industrial city to viable service city during the administration of Carl Stokes, the first African American mayor of a major U.S. city.



Our Lady of the Rock
Vision and Pilgrimage in the Mojave Desert
Lisa Bitel
In text and photographs, this book explores the monthly religious visions of Maria Paula Acuña at Our Lady of the Rock in California's Mojave Desert.



Empire's Twin
U.S. Anti-imperialism from the Founding Era to the Age of Terrorism
Empire's Twin broadens our conception of anti-imperialist actors, ideas, and actions; it charts this story across the range of American history, from the Revolution to our own era; and it opens up the transnational and global dimensions of American anti-imperialism.



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