History > History / U.S. and Canada

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A Not Too Greatly Changed Eden
The Story of the Philosophers' Camp in the Adirondacks
James Schlett
In A Not too Greatly Changed Eden, James Schlett recounts the story of the 1858 Philosophers' Camp at Follensby Pond in the Adirondacks, from the lives and careers of—and friendships and frictions among—the participants to the extensive preparations for the expedition and the several-day encampment to its lasting legacy.



Brethren by Nature
New England Indians, Colonists, and the Origins of American Slavery
Margaret Ellen Newell
In Brethren by Nature, Margaret Ellen Newell reveals a little-known aspect of American history: English colonists in New England enslaved thousands of Indians.



Class Divide
Yale ’64 and the Conflicted Legacy of the Sixties
Howard Jr. Gillette
Howard Gillette Jr. draws on more than one hundred interviews with representative members of the Yale class of ’64 to examine how they were challenged by the issues that would define the 1960s.



Unbuttoning America
A Biography of "Peyton Place"
Ardis Cameron
In this lively account of the writing, publication, and legacy of the 1956 bestselling novel, “Peyton Place,” Ardis Cameron tells how the story of a patricide in a small New England village became a cultural phenomenon.



The Origins of Right to Work
Antilabor Democracy in Nineteenth-Century Chicago
Cedric de Leon
Cedric de Leon traces the antagonism between pro-business politicians and labor to the Northern victory in the U.S. Civil War, when the political establishment equated collective bargaining with the enslavement of free white men.



Forgotten Men and Fallen Women
The Cultural Politics of New Deal Narratives
Holly Allen
Holly Allen explores popular and official narratives of forgotten manhood, fallen womanhood, and other social and moral archetypes during the Great Depression and the Second World War.



War, States, and Contention
A Comparative Historical Study
Sidney Tarrow
In War, States, and Contention, Sidney Tarrow shows how movements from strikes and street protests to riots and civil disobedience to revolution sometimes trigger, animate, and guide the course of war and how they sometimes rise during war and in war's wake to change regimes or even overthrow states.



"No One Helped"
Kitty Genovese, New York City, and the Myth of Urban Apathy
Marcia M. Gallo
Marcia M. Gallo provides a sensitive and multifaceted exploration of one of America's most infamous true-crime stories: the 1964 rape and murder of Catherine "Kitty" Genovese.



Public Housing Myths
Perception, Reality, and Social Policy
Popular opinion holds that public housing is a failure. Over the past decade, however, historians and social scientists have quietly exploded the common wisdom about public housing. This volume provides an updated, panoramic view of public housing.



The Familiar Made Strange
American Icons and Artifacts after the Transnational Turn
In this volume, twelve distinguished historians offer original readings of American icons and artifacts that model new interpretive, transnational approaches to studying American history.



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