New York State and City

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Crossing Broadway
Washington Heights and the Promise of New York City
Robert W. Snyder
Robert W. Snyder tells how the story of New York City's Washington Heights neighborhood, from the the 1930s to the present.


"Crossing Broadway is a brilliant and beautiful book. It brings to the twenty-first-century reader insights—often reflected in the work of Herbert Gans, David Montgomery, and Herbert Gutman—from a long tradition of engagement with the struggles and triumphs of the working people in our great cities. In showing how the residents of Washington Heights linked a devotion to community with uncommon political energy and shrewdness, Robert W. Snyder offers us hope that our nation may... cont'd



The Angola Horror
The 1867 Train Wreck That Shocked the Nation and Transformed American Railroads
Charity Vogel
In a dramatic historical narrative, Charity Vogel tells the gripping, true-to-life story of the 1867 train wreck in Angola, New York, and the characters involved in the tragic accident.


"Vogel's work is gracefully written, and the notes and bibliography reveal a staggering amount of research into contemporary newspapers and other primary sources. This is social history; the author imaginatively reconstructs the lives and experiences of those traveling on the Express that day, as well as the men and women of Angola, New York, who rose to the occasion when disaster struck. . . . The overall result . . . is a vivid depiction of antebellum life and travel."—March... cont'd



From Farm to Canal Street
Chinatown's Alternative Food Network in the Global Marketplace
Valerie Imbruce
In From Farm to Canal Street, Valerie Imbruce tells the story of how Chinatown's food network operates amid—and against the grain of—the global trend to consolidate food production and distribution. Manhattan's Chinatown demonstrates how a local market can influence agricultural practices, food distribution, and consumer decisions.



The Public Universal Friend
Jemima Wilkinson and Religious Enthusiasm in Revolutionary America
Paul B. Moyer
In The Public Universal Friend, Paul B. Moyer tells the story of Jemima Wilkinson and her remarkable church, the Society of Universal Friends.The life of the Public Universal Friend and the Friend's church offer important insights about changes to religious life, gender, and society in Revolutionary America.



Under the Strain of Color
Harlem's Lafargue Clinic and the Promise of an Antiracist Psychiatry
Gabriel N. Mendes
Recapturing the history of a largely forgotten New York City institution that embodied new ways of thinking about mental health, race, and the substance of citizenship. Harlem's Lafargue Mental Hygiene Clinic was founded in 1946.



Air Pollutant Deposition and Its Effects on Natural Resources in New York State
Timothy J. Sullivan
A comprehensive synthesis of past, current, and potential future conditions regarding atmospheric sulfur, nitrogen oxides, ammonium, and mercury deposition; surface water chemistry; soil chemistry; forests; and aquatic biota in New York.



A Not Too Greatly Changed Eden
The Story of the Philosophers' Camp in the Adirondacks
James Schlett
In A Not too Greatly Changed Eden, James Schlett recounts the story of the 1858 Philosophers' Camp at Follensby Pond in the Adirondacks, from the lives and careers of—and friendships and frictions among—the participants to the extensive preparations for the expedition and the several-day encampment to its lasting legacy.



"No One Helped"
Kitty Genovese, New York City, and the Myth of Urban Apathy
Marcia M. Gallo
Marcia M. Gallo provides a sensitive and multifaceted exploration of one of America's most infamous true-crime stories: the 1964 rape and murder of Catherine "Kitty" Genovese.



A Factious People
Politics and Society in Colonial New York
Patricia U. Bonomi
First published in 1971 and long out of print, this classic account of Colonial-era New York chronicles how the state was buffeted by political and sectional rivalries and by conflict arising from a wide diversity of ethnic and religious identities.



Fighting Westway
Environmental Law, Citizen Activism, and the Regulatory War That Transformed New York City
William W. Buzbee
This informative narrative of environmental, political, and legal conflict describes what really happened during the battles over the Westway highway project, providing a new understanding of how modern legal frameworks shape high stakes regulatory wars.



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