New York State and City

   
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The Borscht Belt
Revisiting the Remains of America's Jewish Vacationland
The Borscht Belt, which features essays by Stefan Kanfer and Jenna Weissman Joselit, presents Marisa Scheinfeld's photographs of abandoned sites where resorts, hotels, and bungalow colonies once boomed in the Catskill Mountain region of upstate New York. 


"One winter I went with other teenagers to a convention at Grossinger's and remember my excitement at discovering the indoor swimming pool and the deep heat of their sauna. I recall that the whole place seemed to offer a wonderland of new experiences. I went to the convention again the next year, but I never went back after I left New York. There is a stark difference between my memory and the shell of a resort that exists today. But the past can be given form and detail by photography, and... cont'd



Crossing Broadway
Washington Heights and the Promise of New York City
Robert W. Snyder
Robert W. Snyder tells how the story of New York City's Washington Heights neighborhood, from the the 1930s to the...

Thomas Kessner - Journal of American History

"Drawing on research studies, oral histories, and contemporaneous reporting, Snyder'swell-paced narrative projects the neighborhood’s serial make-overs against the backdrop of Gotham’s turn from postwar industrial and corporate colossus to a place where manufacturing jobs, white people, and corporations seemed to depart all at once.... Historians of the city will find much to think about in this stylish, well-researched, and balanced popular history."



The Angola Horror
The 1867 Train Wreck That Shocked the Nation and Transformed American Railroads
Charity Vogel, Charity A. Vogel
On December 18, 1867, the Buffalo and Erie Railroad’s eastbound New York Express derailed as it approached the high truss bridge over Big Sister Creek, just east of the small settlement of Angola, New York, on the shores of Lake Erie. The last two cars of the express train were pitched completely off the tracks and plummeted into the creek bed...

Journal of American History

"In this impressively researched book, Charity Vogel uncovers the once-lost story of the horrific accident. She provides a gripping narrative of the events leading up to the wreck, the crash itself, and its aftermath. She also firmly situates the episode in the context of nineteenth-century American railroad history, the development of modern journalism, and post-Civil War concers about death, burial, and remembrance. Vogel has conducted extensive research to re-create the tragedy, using or... cont'd



Urban Ornithology
150 Years of Birds in New York City
P. A. Buckley, Walter Sedwitz, William J. Norse, John Kieran



Brooklyn Before
Photographs, 1971–1983
Before Brooklyn rose to international fame there existed a vibrant borough of neighborhoods rich with connections and traditions. During the 1970s and 1980s, photographer Larry Racioppo, a South Brooklynite with roots three generations deep, recorded Brooklyn on the cusp of being the trendy borough we know today.In Brooklyn Before Racioppo lets...



Embattled River
The Hudson and Modern American Environmentalism
David Schuyler
In Embattled River, David Schuyler describes the efforts to reverse the pollution and bleak future of the Hudson River that became evident in the 1950s. Through his investigative narrative, Schuyler uncovers the critical role of this iconic American waterway in the emergence of modern environmentalism in the United States.Writing fifty-five...



Cancer Crossings
A Brother, His Doctors, and the Quest for a Cure to Childhood Leukemia
Tim Wendel
When Eric Wendel was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia in 1966, the survival rate was 10 percent. Today, it is 90 percent. Even as politicians call for a "Cancer Moonshot," this accomplishment remains a pinnacle in cancer research.The author’s daughter, then a medical student at Georgetown Medical School, told her father about this...



The Revolution of ’28
Al Smith, American Progressivism, and the Coming of the New Deal
Robert Chiles
The Revolution of ’28 explores the career of New York governor and 1928 Democratic presidential nominee Alfred E. Smith. Robert Chiles peers into Smith’s work and uncovers a distinctive strain of American progressivism that resonated among urban, ethnic, working-class Americans in the early twentieth century. The book charts the rise of that...



Dagger John
Archbishop John Hughes and the Making of Irish America
John Loughery
Acclaimed biographer John Loughery tells the story of John Hughes, son of Ireland, friend of William Seward and James Buchanan, founder of St. John’s College (now Fordham University), builder of Saint Patrick’s Cathedral on Fifth Avenue, pioneer of parochial-school education, and American diplomat. As archbishop of the Archdiocese of New York...



Oneida Utopia
A Community Searching for Human Happiness and Prosperity
Anthony Wonderley
Oneida Utopia is a fresh and holistic treatment of a long-standing social experiment born of revival fervor and communitarian enthusiasm. The Oneida Community of upstate New York was dedicated to living as one family and to the sharing of all property, work, and love. Anthony Wonderley is a sensitive guide to the things and settings of Oneida...



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