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The People's Colleges
A History of the New York State Extension Service in Cornell University and the State, 1876-1948
Ruby Green Smith
First published in 1949, this book records the story of Cornell University's success in the field of extramural education: the NY State Colleges of Agriculture and Home Economics, the NY State Veterinary College, and the ILR School.



The German People and the Reformation
Recent years have witnessed some dramatic changes in the kinds of questions that historians ask about the religious schisms of sixteenth-century Europe. In the past, scholars tended to treat the Reformation as a chapter in the history of ideas...



People of Paradox
An Inquiry Concerning the Origins of American Civilization
Michael G. Kammen
Puritanical and hedonistic, idealistic and materialistic, peace-loving and war-mongering: these opposing strands go back to the genesis of our history.



First Person, First Peoples
Native American College Graduates Tell Their Life Stories
Colleen Larimore
Finding a balance between tribal values and the demands of campus life is a recurring theme in this landmark collection of personal essays.



The Park and the People
A History of Central Park
Roy Rosenzweig, Elizabeth Blackmar
This "exemplary social history" (Kirkus Reviews) is the first full-scale account of Central Park ever published. Elizabeth Blackmar and Roy Rosenzweig tell the story of Central Park's people—the merchants and landowners who launched the project; the...



People of the Wachusett
Greater New England in History and Memory, 1630–1860
David P. Jaffee
Nashaway became Lancaster, Wachusett became Princeton, and all of Nipmuck County became the county of Worcester. Town by town, New England grew—Watertown, Sudbury, Turkey Hills, Fitchburg, Westminster, Walpole—and with each new community the myth of...



"A People Born to Slavery"
Russia in Early Modern European Ethnography, 1476–1748
Marshall T. Poe
Many Americans and Europeans have for centuries viewed Russia as a despotic country in which people are inclined to accept suffering and oppression. What are the origins of this stereotype of Russia as a society fundamentally apart from nations in...



Many Tongues, One People
The Making of Tharu Identity in Nepal
Arjun Guneratne
The Tharu of lowland Nepal are a group of culturally and linguistically diverse people who, only a few generations ago, would not have acknowledged each other as belonging to the same ethnic group. Today the Tharu are actively redefining themselves as...



People of Faith
Religious Conviction in American Journalism and Higher Education
John Schmalzbauer
Over the past two decades, a host of critics have accused American journalism and higher education of being indifferent, even openly hostile, to religious concerns. These professions, more than any others, are said to drive a wedge between facts and...



"Lazy, Improvident People"
Myth and Reality in the Writing of Spanish History
Ruth MacKay
Since the early modern era, historians and observers of Spain, both within the country and beyond it, have identified a peculiarly Spanish disdain for work, especially manual labor, and have seen it as a primary explanation for that nation's...



Phantom Billing, Fake Prescriptions, and the High Cost of Medicine
Health Care Fraud and What to Do about It
Terry L. Leap
Confronting medical fraud and its economic, psychological, and social costs.



Virtues for the People
Aspects of Plutarchan Ethics



"That the People Might Live"
Loss and Renewal in Native American Elegy
Arnold Krupat
Krupat surveys the traditions of Native American elegiac expression over several centuries, finding that despite differences of language and culture, death and loss are consistently felt by Native peoples both personally and socially.



The Specter of "the People"
Urban Poverty in Northeast China
Mun Young Cho
Cho analyzes the different experiences of poverty among laid-off urban workers and recent migrants, two groups that share a common economic duress in China's Rustbelt cities but who rarely unite as one class owed protection by the state.



Delivering the People's Message
The Changing Politics of the Presidential Mandate
Julia R. Azari
Julia R. Azari finds that when the presidency enjoys high public esteem and party polarization is low, mandate rhetoric is less frequent and employs broad...



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