Missionary Places, 1850–1950

Missionary Places, 1850–1950

Imagining, Building, Contesting Christianities

Situated at the crossroads of missionary history, imperial history, and colonial architecture, the contributions in this volume investigate the architectural staging and spatial implications of the worldwide expansion of Christianity in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. By looking at specific architectural fragments, analysing the insertion of Christian edifices in colonial urban settings, or unravelling the social understanding of missionary places, each of the chapters contemplates an aspect of the agency of mission spaces.

Bringing together scholars from different disciplines, this book approaches missionary places not as the mere décor against which the missionary encounter was enacted, but as an integral part of it. In doing so, the contributors test the applicability of the spatial turn, an interpretative paradigm that has been dominant across the humanities since the late 1990s, to missionary historiography.

Richly illustrated and with a global focus, the volume addresses case studies from, among other countries, China, Japan, Madagascar, Congo, Tanzania, Ghana, and Lebanon.

Bram Cleys

Bram Cleys studied history at KU Leuven and is education officer at the University Centre for Development Cooperation (UCOS), a Belgian NGO.

Contributions:

Religion, Colonization and Decolonization in Congo, 1885–1960/Religion, colonisation et décolonisation au Congo, 1885–1960
Religion in today’s Democratic Republic of Congo has many faces: from the overflowing seminaries, the Marian shrines of the Catholic Church, the Islamic brotherhoods, and the Jewish community of Lubumbashi, to the ‘African’ churches of the Congolese diaspora in Brussels and Paris, the healers of Kimbanguism, the televangelism of the booming...









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