No Path Home

No Path Home

Humanitarian Camps and the Grief of Displacement

"No Path Home is an extremely interesting, engaging, and well-written book. Elizabeth Cullen Dunn’s fluid and clear prose paints a very evocative picture of life for internally displaced persons as well as presenting a clear theoretical account."—Laura Hammond, SOAS University of London, author of This Place Will Become Home

For more than 60 million displaced people around the world, humanitarian aid has become a chronic condition. No Path Home describes its symptoms in detail. Elizabeth Cullen Dunn shows how war creates a deeply damaged world in which the structures that allow people to occupy social roles, constitute economic value, preserve bodily integrity, and engage in meaningful daily practice have been blown apart.

After the Georgian war with Russia in 2008, Dunn spent sixteen months immersed in the everyday lives of the 28,000 people placed in thirty-six resettlement camps by official and nongovernmental organizations acting in concert with the Georgian government. She reached the conclusion that the humanitarian condition poses a survival problem that is not only biological but also existential. In No Path Home, she paints a moving picture of the ways in which humanitarianism leaves displaced people in limbo, neither in a state of emergency nor able to act as normal citizens in the country where they reside.

Elizabeth C. Dunn

Indiana University
Elizabeth Cullen Dunn is Associate Professor of Geography and International Affairs at Indiana University–Bloomington. She is the author of Privatizing Poland, also from Cornell.


Privatizing Poland
Baby Food, Big Business, and the Remaking of Labor
Elizabeth C. Dunn
Privatizing Poland examines the effects privatization has on workers' self-concepts; how changes in "personhood" relate to economic and political transitions; and how globalization and foreign capital investment affect Eastern Europe's integration into the world economy.